Free Poker FAQ

Answers to the Questions People are Asking about Free Poker Online



Playing Online
  1. What games are available online?
  2. What is the most popular online game?
  3. Where can I play Poker Online?
  4. Do I have to play for real money?
  5. How do I play poker online for free?
  6. Is the Poker Software Safe?
  7. Why Do the poker rooms let me play for free forever? Whats the catch?
  8. What is a '4 Color' Deck?
  9. What does it mean to 'Muck' your cards?
Playing for Real
  1. Can I play Poker Online for Real Money?
  2. What is the minimum amount of money I can Play For?
  3. Is online poker legal?
  4. Whats the difference between playing for free and playing for real money?
  5. What is a 'Bonus Code'? Why Should I ALWAYS Use One?
  6. What is a 'Reload Bonus'?
  7. What payment methods can I use to deposit money at an online poker room?
  8. Why cant i use my credit card to make a deposit?
  9. Can I Use Paypal to fund my poker account?
  10. What is the 'Rake'?
  11. How do I cash Out My Winings?
  12. How do i know i will get paid?
Tournament Play
  1. What is a 'Tournament'?
  2. What is a 'Buy In'?
  3. What is a 'ReBuy'?
  4. What is a 'Addon'?
  5. What is an 'Entry Fee'?
  6. What is the 'Prize Pool'?
  7. What is a 'Sit n Go' Tournament or SNG?
  8. What is a 'Freeroll' Tournament?
  9. What is a 'Freeze Out' Tournament?
  10. What is a 'Satellite' Tournament?
  11. Where can I get a list of online tournaments?
  12. What does 'Keeping Ahead of the Blinds' mean?
Major Tournaments
  1. Where can I get the schedules for the Major Tournaments?
  2. What is the World Series of Poker or WSOP?
  3. What is the World Poker Tour or WPT?
  4. What is the 'Party Poker Millions'?
  5. What is the World Poker Open?
  6. What is the Grand Prix De Paris?
  7. What is the United States Poker Championship?
  8. What is the Crown Australian Poker Championship?
  9. What is the Legends of Poker?
Basic Rules
  1. What are the Basic Rules of Poker?
  2. What are the Hand Rankings in Poker?
  3. What are 'Wild cards'? How do they affect the hand rankings?
  4. What is a 'Kicker'?
  5. What is a 'Split' Hand/Pot?
  6. What are 'Connectors'?
  7. What are 'Rags'?
  8. What are the poker hand nicknames?
Game Variations
  1. How many variations of Poker are there?
  2. How do you play Texas Holdem?
  3. What are the Best Starting Hands in Texas Holdem?
  4. How do you play Double Flop Holdem?
  5. How do you play 7 Card Stud?
  6. How do you play 7 Card Stud Hi/Lo?
  7. How Do You Play Omaha?
  8. How do you play Omaha Hi/Lo?
  9. How do you play 5 Card Draw?
  10. How do you play 5 Card Stud?
  11. How do you play Triple Draw?
  12. How do you play Razz?
Game Types
  1. What is a 'Ring' Game?
  2. What is a 'Heads Up' Game?
  3. What is 'Video Poker'?
  4. What is '3 Card Poker'?
  5. What is 'Jackpot Poker'?
Betting/Limits
  1. How Does Betting Work?
  2. What is an 'Ante'?
  3. What are 'Blinds'?
  4. What does going 'All In' Mean?
  5. What is a 'Limit' Game?
  6. What is a 'Pot Limit' Game?
  7. What is a 'No Limit' Game?
  8. What is 'Bluffing'?
  9. What is a 'Calling Station'?
  10. What is a 'Maniac'?
  11. What is a 'Check Raise'?
  12. What does it mean to 'Slow Play' a hand?
  13. What is a 'Bad Beat'?
  14. What is the 'Short Stack'?
  15. What is 'Limping In'?
Poker Odds
  1. What are the basic odds for the standard poker hands?
  2. What are 'Outs' and how do I count them?
  3. What are 'Pot Odds'?
  4. Where can i find more information on poker odds and calculations?
Poker History
  1. What is the History of Modern Poker?
  2. What is the 'Dead Mans' Hand?
  3. What is the 'Poker Hall Of Fame'?
  4. Who is in the Poker Hall of Fame?
Supplies
  1. Where can I buy Poker Supplies Online?
  2. What are the different types of poker chips?
  3. How can I get a Free Poker Chip Set?
  4. What are the Best Books on Poker?
  5. What are the Best magazines on Poker?
  6. What are the Best Poker DVDs?
Misc
  1. What are the 'Nuts'?
  2. What is 'Dead Money'?
  3. What is 'Drawing Dead'?
  4. What does it mean to 'Play the Board'?
About This FAQ
  1. Who maintains this FAQ?
  2. Who pays for this FAQ?
  3. Is this FAQ Copyright? Can I Use it on my website?
  4. Why do you charge a license fee?
  5. Where can I find the most current version of this FAQ?
  6. How can I help support this FAQ?



Playing Online
  1. What games are available online?

    While the selection varies from poker room to poker room, almost all support texas holdem, 7 card stud, and omaha and several variations. See the chart here for specific games supported by the each poker room.

    Here is a list of the Variations we have seen online.


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  2. What is the most popular online game?

    Without question the most popular game, online and worldwide, is No Limit Texas Holdem. Most of the major poker tournaments in the world are No Limit Texas Holdem. Most of the poker shows on tv and cable focus on texas holdem.

    Often called the 'Chess of Poker', It has swept both the United States and the world, becoming the most popular form of poker ever.
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  3. Where can I play Poker Online?

    There are ton of new poker rooms popping up all over the place. Make sure you choose a reputable poker room, and begin with a minimum deposit. Make sure you want to play there before you commit a pile of cash. In general, if you stick to the top poker sites you wont have any problems.

    A good page reviewing the top poker sites is available Here.

    Click Here for a chart comparing the top poker rooms feature by feature.
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  4. Do I have to play for real money?

    Absolutely NOT. Online poker rooms will let you play poker for free forever. There are no limits, you can play as long as you like whenever you like. You can play ring games, Sit N Go's, and Tournaments.

    And if you run out of Play Money, They will give you more. You will never be asked for any credit card or payment information unless you want to play for real money.
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  5. How do I play poker online for free?

    Its easy. Just pick a poker room you would like to try, Download and install the software, and create an account for yourself. Thats it. Now just login and play. You will start off with a stack of play money chips, and if you run out, just go to the cashier and get more. Anytime of the day or night, there is always someone to play with.
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  6. Is the Poker Software Safe?

    Absolutely safe. The last thing the poker rooms want is for you to get viruses or spyware on your computer that prevent you from playing poker. They all take extra care to ensure the downloads are safe, virus and spyware free, and work properly. And if you ever have a problem, their customer service is a phone call away.
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  7. Why Do the poker rooms let me play for free forever? Whats the catch?

    There is no catch. They are hoping that if you find that you like playing poker and find that you are a good player, that you will want to play for real. If you are good you come out ahead, and the poker room comes out ahead because it has another real money player.
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  8. What is a '4 Color' Deck?

    Most online poker rooms have an option to display using a 4 color deck. In a 4 color deck, instead of the hearts and diamonds both being red and the clubs and spades both being black, each suit has its own color. Spades are still black and hearts are still red, but diamonds are blue and clubs are green.

    Using a 4 color deck is reccomended by most online poker players, as it seems to reduce eye fatigue, and you are less likely to make a mistake and see a flush that isnt there after hours of playing.
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  9. What does it mean to 'Muck' your cards?

    The Muck refers to the pile of folded and burned card in front of the dealer. To Muck your cards means to discard them without showing them to anyone.

    Some online poker rooms have an 'Auto Muck' option that will automatically muck your cards when you fold or lose a hand, some poker rooms give you the choice at the end of the hand to show or muck your cards.
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Playing for Real
  1. Can I play Poker Online for Real Money?

    Absolutely. You can play in ring games, tournaments, sitngo's, virtually any kind of game with any stakes from 1 cent to 1000's of dollars. Just make your first deposit (dont forget your bonus code!) and you are ready to play for real. And who knows, you could even win a seat to next years World Series of Poker. Its happened before!
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  2. What is the minimum amount of money I can Play For?

    Some poker rooms have games with antes and blinds as low as 1 cent! You can literally play anything from nickel and dime poker all the way up to the high stakes games. Single table tournaments and SitnGo's for as little as $1 and as much as $1000! And big multitable tournaments with Big prize pools for as little as $5! No matter what your budget, you can play!

    Click Here for a chart showing the minimum deposit and minumum bets for the top poker rooms.
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  3. Is online poker legal?

    This is a complex issue and we are not attorneys. Our advice is to consult a family attourney in the jurisdiction in which you plan to play.
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  4. Whats the difference between playing for free and playing for real money?

    Besides the obvious, that you will be playing with real money, the main difference is that in general the players will be much more conservative, and tend to play better poker.

    This doesnt mean there arent any fish playing for real money, it just means they are far less reckless than at the free tables. This is mostly due to the fact that when you are playing with play money you tend to raise and go all in much more often when you know you can just go get more money if you bust out.
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  5. What is a 'Bonus Code'? Why Should I ALWAYS Use One?

    A Bonus Code is basically Free Money For You when you make your first real money deposit at a poker room. Bonus codes range from outright cash bonuses (Get an Extra $25) to Percentage bonuses (get an Extra 20%) to special bonuses (Get a free entry into this tournament). These are incentives for you to join a particular poker room, and they vary and change often. Be sure to shop around and get the best bonus you can find.

    Every bonus code has some requirements, usually you have to make a minimum deposit and play a certain number of raked hands to be eligible for the bonus. Be sure to check the site for the specific details.

    A good site for the most current bonus codes is Free-Poker-Bonus-Codes.com.
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  6. What is a 'Reload Bonus'?

    A Reload Bonus is a bonus code only offered to exisiting real money players as an incentive for them to make another deposit. Reload bonuses are offered to existing players on a semi regular basis by most of the larger poker rooms.

    Reload bonus codes have some requirements, usually you have to make a minimum deposit and play a certain number of raked hands to be eligible for the bonus. Be sure to check the site for the specific details.
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  7. What payment methods can I use to deposit money at an online poker room?

    The most popular methods for funding your poker account include Neteller, Firepay, IGMPay and other similar online virtual money transfer services, which allow you to fund your virtual account with a wide variety of methods including credit card, online check, and wire transfer, and then fund your poker account from your virtual account.

    Check each poker room to verify the types of payment they accept.

    Click Here for a chart showing the payment methods for the top poker rooms.
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  8. Why cant i use my credit card to make a deposit?

    Many US Banks and credit card issuers have placed restrictions on any transactions which they categorize as gambling or gambling related. You cannot directly fund a poker room or casino account with cards or accounts that have these restrictions. For more information contact your bank or card issuer.
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  9. Can I Use Paypal to fund my poker account?

    No, using paypal to fund any gambling or gambling related services is a violation of their Terms Of Service (TOS) and their Acceptable Use Policy (AUP) and is strictly prohibited. As a result, no legitimate poker room or casino will accept paypal.
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  10. What is the 'Rake'?

    The Rake is the small percentage of every pot the poker room takes. This is how the poker room makes money. The exact amount of the rake depends on how many players contribute to the pot and the size of the pot.

    Every legitimate poker room has its rake schedule posted on their site. In most online poker rooms, as a pot grows, you will see a small chipstack next to the dealer that represents the rake.
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  11. How do I cash Out My Winings?

    Cashing out your winnings is usually very easy. While every poker room supports different cashout options, in general you can choose to have your winnings wired to your bank account, paid out to a virtual account like Neteller or Firepay, or have a check issued and mailed to you. Some cashout options have limits on the amount of money you can transfer per day/week. Check the poker room for specific cashout options and limits.

    Make sure you have fulfilled all of your bonus requirements before you cashout or you may be penalized. If you have not fulfilled all of your bonus requirements your cashout may be reduced and you may forfiet the bonus amount. Please check the bonus requirements carefully.
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  12. How do i know i will get paid?

    By sticking with legitimate online poker rooms and casinos. Ask yourself these questions. Do they post their rake schedule? Do they accept the most common payment methods? Are the regulated? Are they audited? How long have they been online? Do they have a good reputation?
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Tournament Play
  1. What is a 'Tournament'?

    A Tournament is a poker game that goes on until one player has won all the chips in the game. Tournaments can range from 'Heads Up' for 2 players, to single table (typically 10 players), to large multi table tournaments with 100's or 1000's of players. In multi table tournaments as players are eliminated, periodically, the remaining players are consolidated and moved to new tables. Eventually, there is only one table left, and the remaining players have all the chips in the game, and they play to the end.

    In addition, during most tournaments, the blinds or antes will increase periodically as everyones chip stacks increase. Tournaments are usually scheduled events, and usually require that you register as a player before the tournament starts to play. Some tournaments have limits on the maximum number of players allowed to play. If you dont show up to play in a tournament you have registered for, all your hands will be folded and you will lose your buy in and entry fee.
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  2. What is a 'Buy In'?

    A Buy In is that amount each player contributes to the prize pool for the tournament. The basic premise is that if 1000 players each buy in for $5, then there is a prize pool of $5000 for the winner or winners. Most tournaments payout schedules depend on how many people are in the tournament and other factors, and will determine how many places are paid and how much. Consult the specific tournament for payout details.
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  3. What is a 'ReBuy'?

    A Rebuy is an opportunity for a player to purchase more chips during a tournament. Usually the Rebuy is limited to the earlier stages of the game, and this is often called the Rebuy Period. There are often other limits placed on rebuys, such as the number of rebuys permitted.
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  4. What is a 'Addon'?

    An Addon is an opportunity for a player to purchase more chips, usually at the end of the rebuy period. Addons are usually open to any players still left in the tournament.
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  5. What is an 'Entry Fee'?

    In a Tournament, the house does not take a 'rake' from each pot, instead they usually charge a small entry fee in addition to your buyin to the tournament. Entry fees usually average about 10% of the buy in, but tend to be lower in the larger multi table tournaments.
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  6. What is the 'Prize Pool'?

    The Prize Pool is the total amount of money available to pay the winner or winners in a given tournament. Usually the prize pool is made up of all the buy in's by all the players, but in some cases like freerolls, the prize pool is put up by or added to by the poker room itself or other sponsors.
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  7. What is a 'Sit n Go' Tournament or SNG?

    A Sit N Go is an unscheduled tournament that starts whenever enough people sit down to play. Most of the poker rooms online have sit n go's running 24 hours a day, and they are a good way to improve your tournament skills.

    Sit N Go's usually range from single table (6-10 players) to small multi table (3+ tables, 30+ players) and are available for free as well as for real money.
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  8. What is a 'Freeroll' Tournament?

    A Freeroll is a tournament which requires no buyin or entry fee, essentially a free tournament. Usually the poker room will put up a cash prize pool, ranging from $25 to $50,000, to pay the winners.

    Most online poker rooms run freerolls, please check the tournament details for specific information on payouts and player eligibility.
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  9. What is a 'Freeze Out' Tournament?

    A freeze Out Tournament is one is which only the final winning player is paid, usually the entire prize pool. There is no payout schedule as in a normal tournament, only the winner is paid.

    For example, if 500 players buyin to a freeze out tournament for $10 each, the winner would be paid $5000, no one else would get anything.
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  10. What is a 'Satellite' Tournament?

    A satellite is, generally a tournament where the prize is entry into a larger tournament.

    For example, you can buy into the Party Poker Millions Tournament directly for $10,000, or you can play in a qualifying tournaments for $210 and win your entry into the Party Poker Millions. Or you can play in any number of smaller satellites ranging anywhere from $8 to $28 and win your entry into the qualifier.

    There are satellites running most of the year all over the country for most of the major tournaments, both online and offline, including World Poker Tour and World Series of Poker Events.
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  11. Where can I get a list of online tournaments?

    Almost all online poker rooms post their tournament schedule on their websites. You can also log in to the poker room to see an up to the minute tournament summary, as well as see sit n go tournaments. You will need to be logged in to register for a tournament.
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  12. What does 'Keeping Ahead of the Blinds' mean?

    This refers to playing in tournaments, and basically means that since the blinds keep increasing, you cannot sit out every hand waiting for a monster because the blinds will eat up your chipstack. You need to play and win at least a few hands every so often to 'Keep Ahead of the blinds'.
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Major Tournaments
  1. Where can I get the schedules for the Major Tournaments?

    Schedules for the Major Offline Poker Tournaments can be found Here.
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  2. What is the World Series of Poker or WSOP?

    The grandaddy of all poker tournaments, the WSOP was started as an informal all-nighter for Benny Binion and his pals in 1970 and hosted for the last three decades by Binion's Horseshoe Casino.

    It's played annually in April and May, features $20 million in prize money and has landed a prime spot on ESPN. Seats at the big tables are won in satellite games that take place year round at casinos around the globe, or you can buy in directly for $10,000. Official Site

    A summary of all the WSOP winners and bracelet holders can be found Here .
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  3. What is the World Poker Tour or WPT?

    Broadcast every week on the Travel Channel, this has become one of the premier poker tournaments in the world, Drawing the best players from around the world. The WPT championship is held every April at the Bellagio casino in Las Vegas, after a year of satellite events in such far-flung locales as Atlantic City, New Mexico and Inglewood, California, with a buy-in as low as 55 bucks at some of the satellite tourneys. Official Site

    A summary of all the WPT winners can be found Here .
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  4. What is the 'Party Poker Millions'?

    The Party Poker Millions is billed as The world's largest no limit Texas Hold 'Em tournament and one of the richest on the World Poker Tour, with a $3.5-million prize pool in 2004. Played on Holland America's luxurious ms Ryndam in March, most of the players earn their way into the event playing satellite tournaments online at partypoker.com--where preliminary tournaments cost as little as $1 to enter. Official Site

    A summary of all the Party Poker Millions winners can be found Here .
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  5. What is the World Poker Open?

    Jack Binion's World Poker Open is held at the Horseshoe/Gold Strike Casinos in Tunica, Mississippi every January. Put on by the son of Benny Binion, owner of the Horseshoe Casino in Las Vegas and considered by many to be the Father of American Poker, this is a Top US tournament and a part of the WPT. Buy-ins start at $550, and the 2004 winner, Barry Greenstein, pocketed a cool $1.3 million.
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  6. What is the Grand Prix De Paris?

    The Aviation Club de France hosts Europe's most glamorous poker event every July. This is one of europes most prestigious Poker tournaments, part of the World Poker Tour, and it has seen phenomenal growth in the last few years. Last year, Parisian David Benyamine stormed past the competition and pocketed $450,000.
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  7. What is the United States Poker Championship?

    The United States Poker Championship is one of the games' biggest events, played at Donald Trump's Taj Mahal in Atlantic City every September. The 2002 winner, John Hennigan took home over $200,000; the pot was twice that size in 2004 for Toto Leonidas. With a buy-in as low as $335, even the budget poker player can get into this one.
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  8. What is the Crown Australian Poker Championship?

    The first major australian championship, then known as the Australasian Poker Championship, was held July 1998. The main event was a $1,000 buy-in Limit Holdem tournament that attracted 74 entries translating into a $74,000 prizepool.

    Since then the Crown Australian Poker Championship has grown rapidly as more and more people in Australia have been attracted to the game of poker and particularly Holdem. This January a record 133 participants paid $10,000 to enter the No Limit Holdem main event, generating the biggest prizepool ever in the Southern Hemisphere of $1,330,000.
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  9. What is the Legends of Poker?

    A Part of the World Poker Tour, The $5,000 buy in no-limit hold'em championship is held at the Bicycle Casino is Los Angeles every July. With satellite buy-ins as low as $120 and $150,000 guaranteed for the last player standing this tournament draws both the amateurs and the pros.

    In 2005, Doyle Brunson walked away with over $1,100,000 dollars after beating a field of 667, each of which ponied up $5,000 to play.
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Basic Rules
  1. What are the Basic Rules of Poker?
    The most basic game of poker is 5 card draw, in which each player is dealt 5 cards, then each player in turn bets, the cards are turned over and the winner (the one with the highest ranking hand) takes the pot. There are many variations of poker, some involving wild cards, trading or 'draw'ing cards, or community cards shared by all players, but in then end its all about who has the the best 5 card poker hand or the guts to bluff you out of it.
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  2. What are the Hand Rankings in Poker?

    A standard poker hand consists of five cards. In games where a player has more than five cards and selects five to form a poker hand (like Texas HoldEm or 7 Card Stud), the remaining cards do not play any part in the ranking. Poker ranks are always based on five cards only.

    1. Royal Flush - This is the highest poker hand. It consists of A-K-Q-J-10 all in the same suit. Since all suits are equal, all royal flushes are equal.
    2. Straight Flush - Five cards of the same suit in sequence - such as Q-J-10-9-8. In a tie, rank is determined by the high card in the straight, in this case 'Q'. An ace can be 'low', so 5-4-3-2-A IS a straight flush, but the high card is the '5', not the 'A'. A straight flush cannot 'wrap around', so 3-2-A-K-Q is Not a valid straight flush.
    3. Four of a Kind - Four cards of the same rank - such as K-K-K-K. The fifth card is not used in standard poker. In games where it is possible to have 2 fours of a kind of the same rank (such as in games with wild cards), the kicker determines the winner.
    4. Full House - Three cards of one rank (a triplet) and two cards of another rank (a pair) - such as 9-9-9-J-J. With full houses, the rank of the triplet determines which is higher. For example 10-10-10-5-5 beats 9-9-9-K-K. If the triplets are equal, the rank of the pairs determines the winner.
    5. Flush - Five cards of the same suit. When comparing two flushes, the high card determines the winner. If the high cards are equal then the second highest cards are compared; if those are equal too, then the third highest cards, etc.
    6. Straight - Five cards of any suit in sequence - such as Q-J-10-9-8. In a tie, rank is determined by the high card in the straight, in this case 'Q'. An ace can be 'low', so 5-4-3-2-A IS a straight, but the high card is the '5', not the 'A'. A straight cannot 'wrap around', so 3-2-A-K-Q is Not a valid straight.
    7. Three of a Kind - Three cards of one rank (a triplet) plus two other cards. With 3 of a Kind, the rank of the triplet determines the winner. For example 7-7-7-5-J beats 5-5-5-K-Q. If the triplets are equal, the kickers determines the winner.
    8. Two Pairs - A pair is 2 cards of equal rank. In a hand with two pairs, the pairs must be of different ranks (otherwise you would have four of a kind), plus one odd card. With two pair, the hand with the highest pair wins, so Q-Q-3-3-4 beats 10-10-6-6-8 because the queens beat the tens. If the higher pairs are equal, the lower pairs are compared, and if both pairs are the same, the kickers are compared.
    9. Pair - Two cards of equal rank and three other cards. With pairs, the hand with the highest pair determines the winner - so for example 8-8-4-3-2 beats 7-7-A-K-Q. If the pairs are equal, the kickers determine the winner.
    10. High Card - Five cards which do not form any of the combinations listed above. Here the high card determines the winner. If the high cards are equal then the second highest cards are compared; if those are equal too, then the third highest cards, etc.

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  3. What are 'Wild cards'? How do they affect the hand rankings?

    A wild card is a specific card, which can be used as a substitute for any card the holder wishes, including a card the holder already has. Several cards may be designated as wild - for example all the deuces, or one-eyed jacks.

    The hand ranking is the same as described above, except that it is now possible to have five of a kind, in which of course at least one will be represented by a wild card. Five of a kind is the highest combination, beating a Royal Flush.
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  4. What is a 'Kicker'?

    In cases of a tie where not all 5 cards are used to make the hand, the player with the highest extra card, called a 'Kicker' will win the hand. For example, if player 1 has A-A-J-7-4, and player 2 has A-A-9-6-2, player one wins because he has the highest Kicker, the Jack. If the 2 highest kickers are the same, the next highest kicker is used. If there are no more kickers and the hands are still tied, this results in a Split pot.
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  5. What is a 'Split' Hand/Pot?

    A 'Split' Hand or Pot is one where 2 or more players have exactly the same hand, a tie. Since some game variations use community cards or wild cards, it is possible for 2 or more players to end up with the exact same ranking hand. While the rules may differ for some variations, in most cases the pot is divided evenly, or 'Split' up, among the players. Also sometimes called a 'Push'.
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  6. What are 'Connectors'?

    Connectors are 2 cards in sequence, for example 7-8. When both cards are of the same suit, they are called 'Suited Connectors'.
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  7. What are 'Rags'?

    Rags are cards generally not worth playing or that do not affect the outcome of the hand.
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  8. What are the poker hand nicknames?

    In Games where the player is dealt 2 hole cards (texas holdem, 7 card stud, etc), there have arisen nicknames for some of the possible combinations. We present here some of the most popular, but there are many more.

    In addition, some poker hands have developed names also


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Game Variations
  1. How many variations of Poker are there?

    There are easily over 100 well known variations of poker. We have limited the variations listed here to those that are popular and played online (somewhere).
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  2. How do you play Texas Holdem?

    In Hold'em, players get two down cards and five community cards (which are face-up in the middle of the table). Your hand is determined by using the best five of those seven cards in any combination.

    Basics: There are four rounds of betting in Hold'em. In Limit Hold'em, one bet and three raises are allowed for each betting round. Betting always proceeds in a clockwise rotation.

    Here is the procedure for Hold'em:

    1. Prior to dealing the cards, two blinds (the Small Blind and the Big Blind) are placed in the pot by the two players to the immediate left of the dealer (indicated by the red dealer "button"). The blinds are put in to start the action.

    2. Everyone is dealt two down cards ("hole cards"). The betting round begins with the player to the left of the Big Blind.

    3. The dealer then turns over three community cards known as "The Flop". This is the second betting round. Beginning with this round of betting, and throughout the rest of the hand, the player to the left of the button acts first.

    4. The dealer turns over another card, known as "The Turn" or "Fourth Street". This is the third round of betting. (In Limit Hold'em, the amount bet doubles on "The Turn".)

    5. The dealer turns over the last card, known as "The River" card or "Fifth Street". This is the final round of betting.

    6. Upon completion of the final round of betting, the best hand wins the pot.

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  3. What are the Best Starting Hands in Texas Holdem?

    The top 20 Starting Texas Holdem Hands are, in order:

    1. Pair of Aces
    2. Pair of Kings
    3. Pair of Queens
    4. Pair of Jacks
    5. Ace King Suited
    6. Pair of Tens
    7. Ace Queen Suited
    8. Ace Jack Suited
    9. Ace King Offsuit
    10. King Queen Suited
    11. Ace Ten Suited
    12. King Jack Suited
    13. Ace Queen Offsuit
    14. Pair of Nines
    15. Queen Jack Suited
    16. King Ten Suited
    17. Pair of Eights
    18. Queen Ten Suited
    19. Ace Nine Suited
    20. Ace Jack Offsuit

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  4. How do you play Double Flop Holdem?

    Double Flop Holdem is played like Texas holdem, except there are 2 boards (sets of community cards). Each board gets a flop, turn and river, and they are dealt at the same time.

    Players then make the best best hand for each board.

    In some games Double Flop Holdem is played split pot, where the winner of the 1st board takes half the pot and the winner of the 2nd board takes the other half. In some games the best hand from either board wins the entire pot.
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  5. How do you play 7 Card Stud?

    Seven Card Stud is a popular, well-known form of poker. It is played with up to eight players at the table.

    The First round:
    A fresh table starts off with all the players posting the ante.

    In Seven-card stud poker, players receive seven cards, three "down" cards and four "up" cards.

    After the antes have been placed each player is dealt three cards (two "down" cards and one "up" card). The "up" card is also known as the "door card" or "Third Street". The lowest "up" card must initiate the action with a "Bring-In" bet. (If two or more players have the same lowest card, the person who brings it in is determined by suit order progressing from clubs, diamonds, hearts, and spades.)

    Each player is allowed one bet and three raises in each betting round.

    The Second Round:
    After the first round of betting another card is dealt face-up to each player that still remains in the pot. This is "Fourth Street". From "Fourth Street" on, the highest hand showing begins the action by checking or betting. If a pair is showing on "Fourth Street", players have the option to make a single or double bet. If a player makes a single/double bet, the other players may call, raise the single bet, raise the double bet or fold. In case of a double bet, only an equal amount can be raised (to the extent of the double bet).

    The Third Round:
    Upon completion of the betting on "fourth street", another card is dealt face-up to those who remain in the pot. This is called "Fifth Street" (the third round of betting - which doubles (the value of each bet is double of what was available in the first two rounds) - and continues at this amount for the remaining betting rounds). The highest hand showing again starts the action by checking or betting.

    The Fourth Round:
    Upon the completion of betting on "fifth street", another card is dealt face-up. This is "Sixth Street" (fourth betting round).

    The Fifth Round:
    The final card is dealt down. The last card is also known as the "River Card" or "Seventh Street" (final round of betting).

    Some standard rules:
    A maximum of four bets, which includes one bet, and three raises are allowed for each betting round per player. To continue to play, players must take an action from what is displayed to them on each "street" or betting round (unless they are all-in). The term cap is used to describe the final raise in a round since betting is then capped and no one can make another raise. Once capped, players will have the option of calling or folding only.

    Exceptions to the value of betting in each round:

    A player who does not have enough chips to call a bet is declared All-In. The player is eligible for the portion of the pot to the point of his final wager. All further action involving other players takes place in a "side pot", which is unavailable to the player who has already gone All-In.

    Upon completion of the final round of betting, the best hand wins the pot. (The pot may also be won by someone who bets without being called at any time during the hand.). Your "hand" is determined by using the best five of seven cards. A combination of the following may be used -


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  6. How do you play 7 Card Stud Hi/Lo?
    7 card stud Hi/Lo is played just like 7 card stud, except that the highest and lowest ranking hands split the pot. Some Hi/Lo games specify that the low hand must have 5 unpaired cards that are 8 or lower (an ace can be high or low).

    In addition, straights and flushes do not count for the low hand, so the best possible low hand is A2345, also called a 'Wheel'.
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  7. How Do You Play Omaha?

    Omaha is an action game. In Omaha:

    Basics: There are four betting rounds in Omaha. In Omaha High and Omaha 8 or Better, one bet and three raises are allowed per betting round. To continue to play, players must act on each betting round (unless they are "all-in"). Betting always proceeds in a clockwise rotation.

    Here is the procedure for Omaha:

    1. Prior to dealing the cards, two blinds (the Small Blind and the Big Blind) are placed in the pot by the two players to the immediate left of the dealer (indicated by the 'button'). The blinds are put in to start the action.

    2. Everyone is dealt four "down" cards. The action begins with the player to the left of the Big Blind folding, calling, or raising. Play continues with all players making one of these decisions. This is the first betting round.

    3. Upon completion of the first round of betting, three cards are dealt face-up in the center of the table (community cards known as "the Flop"). This is the second round of betting. Beginning with this round of betting and throughout the remaining rounds of betting, the player to the left of the dealer button acts first.

    4. Upon completion of the action on the "flop," another card is dealt face-up (known as the "The Turn" or "Fourth Street"). This is the third betting round. The size of the bet doubles on this round of betting. The betting again starts with the player closest to the left of the button.

    5. Following the completion of action on "the turn", the dealer turns over the last card (known as "The River" or "Fifth Street"). This is the final round of betting.

    6. Upon completion of the final round of betting, the best hand wins the pot.

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  8. How do you play Omaha Hi/Lo?

    Omaha Hi/Lo is played just like Omaha, except that the highest and lowest ranking hands split the pot. The low hand must have 5 unpaired cards that are 8 or lower (an ace can be high or low).

    In addition, straights and flushes do not count for the low hand, so the best possible low hand is A2345, also called a 'Wheel'.
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  9. How do you play 5 Card Draw?

    5 card draw is probably the best known poker variant of all since it is the first one that most people learn. It can be played with 2-8 players.

    1. Prior to the deal, players will post antes and/or blinds as required. Some games only require antes, some only require blinds, some both.
    2. Each player is dealt 5 cards, face down.
    3. A round of betting occurs. In some games players are not permitted to check-raise in the first round of betting.
    4. Each player may 'draw' or trade in, none, some or all of his cards. In some games you may only draw 4 cards if you have an Ace and expose it.
    5. Another round of betting occurs. Check-raises are permitted in this betting round. When this betting round is finished, all players remaining show their hands. The best hand wins the pot.

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  10. How do you play 5 Card Stud?
    5 Card Stud is one of the simplest poker variants. It is played with 2-8 players.
    1. Prior to the deal, players will post antes and/or blinds as required. Some games only require antes, some only require blinds, some both.
    2. Each player is dealt 2 cards, one face down (in the hole) and one exposed.
    3. The player with the lowest exposed card is forced to make a 'bring in' bet, usually half of the minimum bet.
    4. A 3rd exposed card is dealt to each player. In this and subsequent betting rounds, the player with the best exposed hand begins the betting round.
    5. A 4th exposed card is dealt to each player, followed by another betting round.
    6. The 5th and final card is dealt face down to each player, and a final round of betting occurs. In some games this final card is exposed.
    7. The player with the best hand wins.

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  11. How do you play Triple Draw?

    Triple Draw poker is 5 Card Draw Lowball (low hand wins) with 3 draws instead of one. There is a betting round in between each draw. This makes for a game with alot of luck and action.

    In A-5 Triple Draw the lowest hand wins, straights and flushes do not count and aces are low. The best hand in A-5 Triple Draw is A2345.

    In 2-6 Triple Draw the lowest hand still wins, but straights and flushes do count, and aces are high. The best hand in 2-6 Triple Draw is 23457 (no flush).
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  12. How do you play Razz?

    Razz is played just like 7 Card Stud, except the lowest ranking hand wins instead of the highest.
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Game Types
  1. What is a 'Ring' Game?

    A 'Ring' Game is one where you can sit down at a table whenever a seat is available, play as long as you choose, change tables whenever you want, and leave whenever you want. Essentially a continous poker game with players sitting down and leaving all the time.

    Ring games for most poker variations and limits are available at all the online poker rooms 24 hours a day for both play and real money, and are very popular.
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  2. What is a 'Heads Up' Game?

    Heads Up refers to a game where 2 players play against each other until one is eliminated.
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  3. What is 'Video Poker'?

    Video poker is an electronic draw poker game, played either at a machine in a casino, on a computer screen or hand held device, you can even play video poker on certain cell phones. In the casino, while video poker may appear to look like the electronic slot machines, in video poker the player has an influence on the outcome of the hand, unlike slot machines.

    Every video poker hand is a completely new entity from a freshly shuffled deck. There is no relationship to the preceding or subsequent hand. The odds of making a Royal Flush, the Jackpot hand, is the same on every hand - even if the previous hand was a Royal Flush.

    The object of video poker is to make the highest possible ranking poker hand from the five cards initially dealt to you along with any replacement cards you draw. The rank of the final hand determines the amount won, and it is always the highest ranking hand that can be made from the final five cards.

    The only decision you need to make when you're playing video poker is which of the five cards you are dealt should be held and which cards should be discarded and replaced.
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  4. What is '3 Card Poker'?

    3 Card Poker, also known as Tri Poker, 3 poker, etc., is a popular casino style card game. The aim is to complete the game of 3 Card Poker with the strongest poker hand. All payouts are dependent on the value of the poker hand you are holding.
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  5. What is 'Jackpot Poker'?

    In Jackpot Poker a small percentage of the rake contributes to an ever increasing jackpot. Usually, to win the jackpot a player would need to get a very good hand beaten. While the specifics vary from place to place, the most common jackpots are paid out when aces full are beaten, or when pocket aces lose. These are sometimes also called Bad Beat Jackpots.
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Betting/Limits
  1. How Does Betting Work?

    The specifics of betting vary greatly from game to game, from which player begins the betting round to how many raises are permitted to how much may be bet. In general a round of betting in poker goes like this.

    The first player to bet has the choice to Bet, Check (and pass the bet), or Fold (and retire from the hand). Each player in turn has the same choices except that once a bet has been made, a player may only Call (match the previous bet), Fold, or Raise (by betting more than the previous bet). Players who checked previously will need to call or fold in their turn. The betting round ends when all players have either called or folded.
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  2. What is an 'Ante'?

    An Ante is a small bet placed by every player before each hand. It is used to give every player a stake in every pot and improve the 'action' of the game.
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  3. What are 'Blinds'?

    A Blind is a forced bet put in by one or more players before any cards are dealt. Blinds are usually put in by players immediately to the left of the dealer and usually represent the minimum bet allowed.

    In Texas Holdem The small blind (1/2 the minimum bet) is placed by the player immediately to the left of the dealer, and the big blind (the minimum bet) is placed by the next player to the left of the dealer.
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  4. What does going 'All In' Mean?

    Only allowed in a No Limit Game, going All In refers to betting all your remaining chips. This is one of the things that makes No limit games so exciting, that anyone can lose or win everything in one hand.
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  5. What is a 'Limit' Game?

    In a 'Limit' Game there are specific limits on the amounts you may bet and raise, and the number of raises permitted. The specific details vary from poker room to poker room, and from game to game, so check the rules for the gory details.
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  6. What is a 'Pot Limit' Game?

    In a 'Pot Limit' game, a player may bet up to the amount currently in the pot and no more. Pot Limit is interesting in that the more betting there is the bigger the pot becomes and the higher the bets can be which makes the pot even bigger which... Some variations have minimum required bets and limits on the number of raises.
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  7. What is a 'No Limit' Game?

    In a 'No Limit' game, there are no limits placed on the amount you may bet or raise or on the number of raises allowed. Some variations do have minimum required bets, but there is no limit on the maximum bet. A player may bet any or all of his chips at any time.
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  8. What is 'Bluffing'?

    Bluffing is to represent a much better hand than you really have in an effort to win the pot by getting everyone else to fold. Often when players bluff they have nothing at all. Many say that bluffing is an art form, knowing when to bluff and for how much is the challenge.
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  9. What is a 'Calling Station'?

    A Calling Station is a weak-passive player who calls a lot, but doesn't raise or fold much. This is the kind of player you like to have in your game.
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  10. What is a 'Maniac'?

    A Maniac is a player who bets, raises and bluffs over much and over agressively. Maniacs are constantly trying to push other players out of pots with overly large bets and raises.

    While a maniac may do well in the short term, eventually the odds catch up with them and they run into a better hand.
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  11. What is a 'Check Raise'?

    A Check Raise occurs when a player checks the bet, another player bets, and when the bet comes back around, he now raises. This can be done to 'test the waters' before making a large bet, or it can be used to try and intimidate other players into folding. A perfectly valid poker tactic, it is permitted in most casinos.
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  12. What does it mean to 'Slow Play' a hand?

    Slow Playing a hand is to represent a much weaker hand than the one you really have. This is normally done to try to lull other players into putting more money in the pot. Slow playing a hand can backfire when, by simply checking or calling, you allow another player to draw into a much better hand.
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  13. What is a 'Bad Beat'?

    To have a heavily favored hand lose to an underdog hand. The implication is that the winner of the pot had no business even being in the hand, and only won due to absolute sheer luck.
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  14. What is the 'Short Stack'?

    The Short Stack refers to the player at the table with the fewest chips remaining. In games like texas holdem, being short stacked is a considerable disadvantage.
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  15. What is 'Limping In'?

    Limping in refers to calling a minimum bet before the flop in the hope of seeing the flop cheaply or in preparation to check raise later.
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Poker Odds
  1. What are the basic odds for the standard poker hands?
    Poker Hand Probabilities
    Odds of Being Dealt a Given Hand in 5 Cards
    Hand # Ways Odds
    Royal Flush 4 1 in 649,740.00
    Straight Flush 36 1 in 72,193.33
    Four of a Kind 624 1 in 4,165.00
    Full House 3,744 1 in 694.16
    Flush 5,108 1 in 508.80
    Straight 10,200 1 in 254.80
    Three of a Kind 54,912 1 in 47.32
    Two Pair 123,552 1 in 21.03
    One Pair 1,098,240 1 in 2.36
    No Pair Hand 1,302,540 1 in 1.99
    Total 2,598,960  

    The poker probability of being dealt a pair or better in the first five cards dealt is almost even -- to be exact, .499 -- and the poker probability of being dealt a no-pair hand is practically the same -- .501. So it's almost a 3 to 1 chance, when playing against two opponents, that one of them will hold a pair or better in the first five cards dealt. The poker probability varies slightly depending upon what you hold.
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  2. What are 'Outs' and how do I count them?

    Basically, an out is any card that will complete your hand. Once you know your Outs, you know what the percentage chance of improving your hand is.

    For example, If you have 4 hearts and you are drawing to the flush, then you have 9 outs, the number of hearts remaining in the deck. And if you have an open ended straight draw, you have 8 outs.

    Now, divide the number of cards remaining in the deck by the number of outs, and you get the percentage chance that you will get one of your outs.

    Or, For texas Holdem, you can just use the table below.

    OutsOn TurnOn RiverOn Both
    1 2.13% 1:47.0 2.17% 1:46.0 4.26% 1:23.5
    2 4.26% 1:23.5 4.35% 1:23.0 8.42% 1:11.9
    3 6.38% 1:15.7 6.52% 1:15.3 12.49% 1:8.0
    4 8.51% 1:11.8 8.70% 1:11.5 16.47% 1:6.1
    5 10.64% 1:9.4 10.87% 1:9.2 20.35% 1:4.9
    6 12.77% 1:7.8 13.04% 1:7.7 24.14% 1:4.1
    7 14.89% 1:6.7 15.22% 1:6.6 27.84% 1:3.6
    8 17.02% 1:5.9 17.39% 1:5.8 31.45% 1:3.2
    9 19.15% 1:5.2 19.57% 1:5.1 34.97% 1:2.9
    10 21.28% 1:4.7 21.74% 1:4.6 38.39% 1:2.6
    11 23.40% 1:4.3 23.91% 1:4.2 41.72% 1:2.4
    12 25.53% 1:3.9 26.09% 1:3.8 44.96% 1:2.2
    13 27.66% 1:3.6 28.26% 1:3.5 48.10% 1:2.1
    14 29.79% 1:3.4 30.43% 1:3.3 51.16% 1:2.0
    15 31.91% 1:3.1 32.61% 1:3.1 54.12% 1:1.8
    16 34.04% 1:2.9 34.78% 1:2.9 56.98% 1:1.8
    17 36.17% 1:2.8 36.96% 1:2.7 59.76% 1:1.7
    18 38.30% 1:2.6 39.13% 1:2.6 62.44% 1:1.6
    19 40.43% 1:2.5 41.30% 1:2.4 65.03% 1:1.5
    20 42.55% 1:2.4 43.48% 1:2.3 67.53% 1:1.5

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  3. What are 'Pot Odds'?

    Pot Odds is the amount of money in the pot compared to the amount you must put in the pot to continue playing.

    For example, suppose there is $54 in the pot. Someone bets $6, so the pot is now $60. It will cost you $6 to call, so your pot odds are 1:10. If your chance of having the best hand is at least one out of eleven (see counting outs), you should call.

    Pot odds can also apply to draws. For example, if you are drawing to a flush with one card left, your chances are about 1:4. If it will cost you $5 to call, then there needs to be at least $20 in the pot to justify a call.
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  4. Where can i find more information on poker odds and calculations?

    Try Dr. Brian Alspach's Home Page - Professor Emeritus, Dept. of Mathematics and Statistics, Simon Fraser University.

    Dr. Anspach has written many good papers on the computation of poker, and is considered an expert in the field. Most of his papers are online in full text as well as links to all his poker digest articles (there are quite a few). This guy is the guru.

    You can also check out HoldemSim, a continuosly running texas holdem simulation that is well over 200 million hands and climbing.
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Poker History
  1. What is the History of Modern Poker?

    It is thought that the modern game of poker is derived from an 18th century french game called 'poque' (pronounced poke).

    The first mention of the game was by English actor Joseph Crowell as played in New Orleans in 1829. It was played with a deck of 20 cards, and four players bet on which player's hand of cards was the highest. Jonathan H. Green's book An Exposure of the Arts and Miseries of Gambling (G. B. Zieber, Philadelphia, 1843) described the effect the mississippi riverboats had on the spread of the game from there to the rest of the country.

    Soon after this, the standard 52-card deck was used, and the flush was introduced. During the American Civil War, many changes were made to the game, including draw poker, 5 card stud poker, and the addition of the straight. Further American developments included the wild card (around 1875), lowball and split-pot poker (around 1900), and community card poker games (around 1925). The spread of the game to other countries, notably Asia, is often attributed to the U.S. military.

    In the 1940's and 50's, poker was played mostly in the roadhouses, and had a considerably bad reputation. People like Doyle Brunson and others, traveled the back roads in texas playing poker in backrooms, it was, after all, illegal then. In 1951, Benny Binion created Binions Horseshoe Casino, and began to cater to poker players.

    By 1960, poker was played in homes all around the US, and while it may have been technically illegal, usually only a misdemeanor, it became a very popular game among suburban men.

    Modern poker tournaments became popular in American casinos after the World Series of Poker began in 1970. This was also the period that the first serious poker strategy books appeared, including The Theory of Poker by David Sklansky, Doyle Brunson's Super System: A Course in Power Poker, and Caro's Book of Poker Tells by Mike Caro.

    The current popularity of poker in america is largely due to 2 factors. The first was the introduction of the 'satelite' tournament by Jack Binion, Benny's son. This allowed almost anyone to have a chance at the big money for a small investment.

    The second factor was the explosion of poker tournaments on cable and television. The number of poker related shows is increasing every season, with no signs of stopping anytime soon.

    It is estimated that there are now (2005) about 50 million poker players in the United States alone.
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  2. What is the 'Dead Mans' Hand?

    The Dead Man's Hand, two pair - black aces and black eights, is purported to be the hand that Wild Bill Hickok was holding when he was shot to death in Deadwood, South Dakota on August 2nd, 1876. Jack McCall, seeking revenge for the death of his brother, shot Hickok in the back of the head.
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  3. What is the 'Poker Hall Of Fame'?

    The Poker Hall of Fame was created in 1979 to recognize oustanding achievements or significant contributions to the game of Poker. It is located at Binions Horshoe Casino in Las Vegas.

    The Selection Criteria for the Hall of Fame is straightforward and the standards are high:


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  4. Who is in the Poker Hall of Fame?

    The names are listed with the year they were inducted.


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Supplies
  1. Where can I buy Poker Supplies Online?

    There are obviously alot of places online to buy poker supplies, Just stick to the reputable online dealers with real websites. Make sure they have a privacy policy as well as a reasonable return policy.

    We reccomend WorldPokerOutlet.com. They feature casino quality poker chips, poker chip sets, poker table tops, accessories, poker chip cases, playing cards and more. Plus get a Free copy of Bluff magazine with any purchase!

    You can also search for poker supplies on eBay! and Amazon
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  2. What are the different types of poker chips?

    There are many different types of poker chip, ranging in quality and price. Here is a basic breakdown, from the worst to the best.

    1. Plastic Interlocking - These are the chips you played with as a kid, made from plastic in bright colors with ridges that lock together when you stack them. Cheap crap, you can buy 100 for about $1.99.
    2. Basic Plastic - These chips approximate the size of a regular poker chip, and usually have the suits or dice around the edge. They look like real poker chips, but are brittle and sound like plastic, with rounded edges. Still cheap crap, about $10 for 200 chips.
    3. Clay Composite - These chips are made from a high quality plastic with a metal core to add balance and weight. These have sharp edges which will almost never wear down, and are hard to damage. They vary in quality from a cheap composite chip thats hard and feels like plastic, to a nicer chip with a good texture and feel, and a better sound. An inexpensive solution for a nice home game, a set of 300 will run you from $50-$200.
    4. Real Clay - These chips are the real thing, the same chips they use in the casinos. They are made from a clay material that is compressed under high temperatures and extreme pressure. Real clay chips will 'soften' with age, the edges will slowly round off, and the texture will improve. And they sound right! A good set of Real Clay chips can cost anywhere from about $0.20 to more than $2.00 per chip!

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  3. How can I get a Free Poker Chip Set?

    There are basically 2 ways we know of to get a free poker chip set online. Both work. We have received merchandise from both methods.

    1. You can signup to a poker room using the special offer at This website, make the required first deposit and have your chip set delivered to your door. You can deposit as little as $20, and there are several poker rooms that participate in this offer. And it even includes free shipping in the continental US.

    2. You can signup with a poker room, make a deposit and play for real money. Most poker rooms have a players club or points system. As you play you will accumulate points or credits, and when you have enough you can redeem your points for a poker chip set or anything else they have. For specific bonus programs and merchandise available consult each poker room.

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  4. What are the Best Books on Poker?

    You can browse the bestselling poker books at Amazon by clicking Here.

    Or may we reccomend


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  5. What are the Best magazines on Poker?

    These are some of the most widely published poker magazines.


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  6. What are the Best Poker DVDs?

    You can browse the bestselling poker dvds at amazon by clicking Here

    Or may we reccomend


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Misc
  1. What are the 'Nuts'?

    The Nuts refers to having the absolute best hand possible given the current cards on the board.
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  2. What is 'Dead Money'?

    Dead Money refers to the chip stack of a player with little or no experience, and virtually no chance of winning a tournament.
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  3. What is 'Drawing Dead'?

    Drawing Dead refers to a player drawing cards to a hand not knowing that another player has a higher ranking hand that he cannot beat no matter what cards he draws. For example, someone drawing to a flush vs someone with 4 of a kind. Even if he makes the flush, he has lost the hand.
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  4. What does it mean to 'Play the Board'?

    To play a hand in texas hold'em when the cards in your hand dont make any better hand than what is on the board. Note that if you play the board, the best you can do is to split the pot with all remaining players.
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About This FAQ
  1. Who maintains this FAQ?

    I do. I wanted an online poker FAQ that was as informative and basic as possible and was not another thinley veiled attempt to advertise poker sites. I have been an online poker player since 2001 and a webmaster a lot longer.
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  2. Who pays for this FAQ?

    This FAQ is supported by the few small links to sponsors, like Amazon.com, that generate revenue to offset the hosting and other costs associated with this FAQ. All of the sponsor links in this FAQ are endorsed by me, and in most cases I have personally checked out the sponsor and the product.
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  3. Is this FAQ Copyright? Can I Use it on my website?

    Absolutely, this faq and the entire website are copyright. You may not copy or use it, or any part of it, in any way without our express permission. You may contact us to inquire about licensing requirements and fees.
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  4. Why do you charge a license fee?

    Two reasons actually. First, it took alot of work and many hours to create this document, and many more are spent maintaining it. And second, every time I license this document for use on the web, it dilutes my content, since some search engines, most notably google, are penalizing sites based on duplicate content.
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  5. Where can I find the most current version of this FAQ?

    The most up to date version of this FAQ can always be found at FreePokerFaq.com.
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  6. How can I help support this FAQ?

    There are many ways you can help us support this FAQ


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Copyright © 2005 by Zymgo. All Rights Reserved.
Disclaimer: While every effort is made to keep this document current, it is possible that some of the information presented here may be innacurate or out of date.
Zymgo specifically disclaims any responsibilty or liability, direct, indirect or consequential, arising from the use of this information.

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